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Engaged team led to results in the World Cup semi-final

Given Germany’s 7-1 demolition of Brazil last night, what can the winners of tonight’s semi-final do to ensure they don’t suffer the same fate in the final?


At BI WORLDWIDE, we believe that demonstrating the right behaviours leads to the right results. Using the World Cup as an example, last night Germany demonstrated the unity, passion, and focus needed to unceremoniously dump Brazil out of the World Cup.

It was a sad moment for Brazil that often made awkward viewing for the football neutral, but the difference in team ethic between the two teams was there for everyone watching on the big screen on the Copacabana to see. But not only was it a sad moment, it was historical. According to BBC Sport, it’s the first time a team has conceded seven goals in a World Cup Semi-Final. For the previous biggest defeat we have to go way back to 1954 when West Germany (spot the pattern) thrashed neighbours Austria 6-1.

So why were the Germans so commanding? Quite simply, they played for each other, not for personal glory. They were committed to the ethos and core values of ‘the team’. It was ‘the team’ that won, ‘the team’ that created opportunities, and ‘the team’ that achieved ‘the team’ goal: secure a place in the 2014 World Cup Final.

The strong leadership of the German team, on and off the field, clearly inspired this behaviour in each team player. Nowhere was this more evident than the reaction of Germany keeper Manuel Neuer, clearly devastated with conceding the goal that deprived his ‘team’ of a clean sheet.

Looking ahead to Sunday’s final, there’s no doubt that the winner of tonight’s game between Argentina and Netherlands will be concerned about facing the indomitable Germans. Let’s hope that the winner can learn from Brazil’s mistakes and take a team into the game, not 11 individuals.

Encouragingly, it’s a sentiment echoed by, ironically, Lionel Messi, a man that could take on most teams single-handedly. But despite his dizzying talents, he clearly understands the importance of a common goal.

Messi was quoted on the FIFA World Cup 2014 Twitter (@WorldCup_Net): "I absolutely do not agree that Argentina are nothing without me, Football is a team game." He continued: "Yes, I scored a few important goals which have helped our team, but there are 10 other members of the team who helped us reach here."

Whether Messi and his team mates can reach the final remains to be seen, but what is apparent is that whoever meets Germany will need to pull together and play for each other.

So good luck to all the players, and may the best ‘team’ win.

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